Still and Box Alarm fire in Chicago

All posts tagged Still and Box Alarm fire in Chicago

Still & Box Alarm fire at 11809 Michigan Avenue in Chicago August 4, 2019

Chicago fire scene at night
Steve Redick photo
Chicago fire scene at night
Steve Redick photo
Chicago fire scene at night
Steve Redick photo
Chicago fire scene at night
Steve Redick photo
Chicago fire scene at night
Steve Redick photo

more photos at Chicagoareafire.com

Here are just a few images from a Still and Box Alarm at 7041 South Green Street in Chicago 3/30/19. These were taken about 10-15 minutes after the box was requested. I didn’t have much time to work since CPD cleared everyone from the front of the building shortly after I arrived so this was the best I could come up. – Eric Haak

Chicago FD Engine 54 at fire scene
Eric Haak photo
smoke from house fire
Eric Haak photo
Firefighters overhaul fire with lots of smoke
Eric Haak photo

At 0445 Sunday morning (12/23), Chicago FD Engine 75 landed at 117th and LaSalle Street and reported they had a fire in a 2.5-story frame. A few minutes later, Battalion 22 asked for a box and stated he had fire in two buildings. There was a fair amount of fire in the attic of the frame structure as companies forced entry but they eventually were able to access the attic and knock it down before the fire could gain any headway.

heavy smoke from house on fire at night

Eric Haak photo

house on fire at night

Eric Haak photo

Chicago FD Engine 62

Eric Haak photo

Firefighters on roof during a. house fire

Eric Haak photo

Firefighter overhaul attic after a house fire

Eric Haak photo

Still And Box Alarm at 4547 S. Wolcott in Chicago on July 4th

flames through the roof after firemen vent the roof

Tim Olk photo

flames through the roof after firemen vent the roof

Tim Olk photo

flames through the roof after firemen vent the roof

Tim Olk photo

flames through the roof after firemen vent the roof

Tim Olk photo

flames burn through the roof of a house

Tim Olk photo

flames burn through the roof of a house

Tim Olk photo

firemen overhauls after battling fire

Tim Olk photo

Chicago area fire photographer Erick Haak submitted the following account of his beginning as a fire photographer.

In honor of the opening of this great endeavor, I thought I would share some of my first pictures and a short tale about how I became interested in fire photography.

In the winter of 2006, I had become bored with my usual routine and decided that I wanted to do something different.  As a middle school teacher, I occasionally found myself with a lot of time on my hands. So that  December, I decided I would take my interest in photography and begin doing a photo study about all of the fire stations in the city of Chicago.  I had no clue what I was doing.  I knew nothing about the fire department and had to look up each house on a map and do a few a day.  I was the kind of person who would have easily called an engine a “fire truck”.  I didn’t own a scanner and didn’t know much about the north side of the city.

Chicago Fire Department

Chicago firehouse for Engine 14 and Truck 19. Eric Haak photo

On the day after Christmas, I headed out to add a few houses to the ones I had already shot earlier that month.  I had six stations that I was going to make it to that day, and Engine 14 was the last on my list.  I arrived at their quarters just after noon and as I began to snap off a few photos, the doors opened up and the lights of Engine 14 and Truck 19 went on.  At the time I didn’t know that companies routinely went on ambulance assists and box checks and the rest of the daily grind.  I thought immediately that they must be going to a fire!

I ran to my car and began heading down Chicago Avenue.  I could see the lights up ahead in the distance but they had gained a lot on me and I was hoping I wouldn’t lose them.  I had no idea where they were going.  As I sat through a few red lights I realized that they had stopped a few blocks ahead.  At first, I wasn’t sure if there was a fire as the smoke conditions in the front of the building weren’t much.  The second photo of Truck 19 raising their aerial is what I saw as I approached and you can see there was a little smoke showing from the front door of a pizza place.

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

I ran around the back to the alley and found that the seat of the fire was in the kitchen.  There was a wood frame addition in the rear of the 2-story ordinary which housed supplies and the fire was quickly spreading to this addition.  The cook of the restaurant hesitated calling the fire department when he had tried to contain a flash over on his own.

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

The fire would eventually be boxed and the rest of the story you can see in the pictures.  The fire consumed the back portion and pushed through the roof.  Eventually companies took position next door to get a better vantage point.  The 12th battalion chief can be seen in the last photo checking on conditions as these companies hit the fire from above.  I think I went out and bought a scanner the next day.  I had no idea how hard it would be to get in this position again!  Being on scene as the first due companies are stretching can be a tough task and I have been pursuing that scenario ever since.

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department

Eric Haak photo